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THE STORY OF LAHORE DIAMOND NECKLACE (CORONATION NECKLACE)

THE STORY OF LAHORE DIAMOND NECKLACE (CORONATION NECKLACE)

Did you know that the necklace that Queens of United Kingdom wear on their own or their husbands’ coronation or at the state functions is known as the Lahore Diamond Necklace?
When the British entered the Lahore Fort in 1849 they found a treasure beyond their wildest imagination. We all know about the Koh-i-Noor that the British took away but there was a lot more in there than just the Koh-i-Noor. List of items in the ‘Toshakhana’ of the Fort was handed over to Dr. John Login, the Administrator of the fort. Based on the old list, he made a new list of the treasure inside for the ‘honorable’ East India Company which included, among other items, the Koh-i-Noor, five bags of diamonds, 134 large gharras of gold jewelry and precious stones, a whole store of expensive and rare Cashmere shawls and choghas, relics of Holy Prophet (pbuh) (including his shoes, walking stick, shirt, cap as well as several locks of his hair). This is only a fraction of the wealth they took away from Lahore. From the bags of diamonds was made the Lahore diamond necklace for the Queen Victoria. The Queen had this necklace made in 1858 from 28 stones that she had removed from Garter Badge and a ceremonial sword, also from Lahore. The necklace added upto 161 carats, making it the most expensive necklace in the world with nine largest stones weighing between 8 and 11 carats and the pendant stone, weighing 22.5 carat (cut down from original 103 carat). That pendant stone is the Lahore Diamond hence the name of the necklace. Till date this necklace is among the most expensive necklaces in the world.
So every time the Queen of England steps out in all her royalty for state functions adorning the Lahore Diamond necklace, you can afford a meek smile for you know where her royalty (read white supremacy) comes from.
As a side note, the relics of Holy Prophet (pbuh) in the toshakhana were bought by the Fakir Family for a sum of Rs. 300,000 in early 1800’s and were originally kept inside the Lahore Fort. In 1847, Fakir Noor-ud-din, who was serving as the member of Regency Council for Maharja Duleep Singh, created a waqf for the relics and allotted Rs. 800,000 for their maintenance. When the British got hold of the list of treasure at the Toshakhana, the relics were missing. When they found out that the relics were with the Fakir Family they were demanded to be handed over. The family archives report of an altercation between Governor General Dalhousie and Fakir Noor-ud-din on the matter and it was only brought to rest when Fakir Noor-ud-din brought it to the Governor General’s notice that they had been placed under a waqf and even the English law prohibited gifting any item placed under a trust. Thus the relics were saved from being gifted away like the other treasures and are still in possession of the Fakir Family who display them every year in Muharram at their Durbaar-e-Aali near the Fakir Khana museum.

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